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All Posts (Tauwasser)




#1
Re: Flashboy+ NEED mini usb cable
Posted on: 1/5 0:09
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Wasn't it because the USB isn't routed all that well and that's why you have to keep cable lengths short? Maybe a ferrite would help, too.
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#2
Re: Virtual Boy won
Posted on: 2017/1/11 0:24
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
The VUE-AA3A games use CR-1616 batteries with two leads, like these.
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#3
Re: link cable
Posted on: 2016/1/27 8:30
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
You might want to check out the following two threads:

[list]
[*]Homemade Link Cable
[*]Link Cable project interest
[/list]

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#4
Re: Collecting Tiger R-Zone
Posted on: 2015/12/14 23:16
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Are these dumped and/or preserved for the future? How is each unit different from the other -- just ROM, peripherals, too, etc.?

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#5
VBJaEngine Support Forum
Posted on: 2015/12/14 23:15
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Is the VBJaEngine Support Forum supposed to show up as unread on every visit with no threads inside? Or am I missing something here?

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#6
Re: Likelihood of new VR from Nintendo?
Posted on: 2015/12/11 21:22
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Quote:

thunderstruck wrote:
If you look at the sales numbers of the original Kincet it was quite successful. It sold sold 8 million units in its first 60 days and has received the Guinness World Record of being the "fastest selling consumer electronics device". I think it sold something like 24 million units. The new Kincet (that came with the XBox One) didn't sell that well. It is hard to say if that is the Kincets fault or because it was bundled with the XBox One (which didn't sell that great). However, the XBox One sales doubled after removal of Kinect from the bundle.


To be fair, there was also huge interest in the scientific and hobbyist community, because it was the first time that such a high-resolution depth sensor came attached with such a low price tag. I know my department at university alone bought 20+ Kinects right when they came out.

cYa,

Tauwasser

P.S.: Nice to see you sober up between the first and second paragraphs *Kincet :P*
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#7
Re: Custom Wireless Controllers
Posted on: 2015/10/23 0:43
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Quote:
RunnerPack wrote:
BTW, Tauwasser, why did you ask "why does it have to be RF?", and then only offer RF-based solutions?


Sorry, I was making a distinction between RF as in home-automation, where you define the protocol yourself and BT with HID, where the protocol is fixed. I should have been more clear about that.

Quote:
RunnerPack wrote:
I think Tauwasser's idea to use the ISM-band radio modules makes the most sense for use on an actual SNES (or VB). AFAIK, there are no cheap BT host modules you can use for the receiving end.


It depends on what you mean by cheap. I've used WT12 chips by bluegiga to host the Wiimote before. While it's true that it doesn't have an HID host mode, there is very little decoding to do in software, meaning you can just connect using L2CAP. That's ~30 EUR.

The iWrap stack is documented, but the documentation is a bit wonky in terms of optional arguments, argument lengths or expected formats -- but workable. Bluegiga even have their own way of reading/writing GPIOs of the modules.

The WT12 is a bit old and not BLE, but you get the point. Look at the various standard profiles, particularly HID.

For prototyping, you might want to get a breakout board for some device with the right profiles, play around a bit and get it working initially. Also, aren't there already bluetooth SNES pads available? If so, it might be easier to use one of those and only implement the BT2SNES controller bridge.

As for the actual implementation, you'll need to know the data format the SNES uses. I think one of your previous forums posts even covered this. Then, choose a microcontroller and have it act like a shift register, i.e. SPI slave.
Bluetooth chips can usually be controlled via UART text commands from the microcontroller. So have a UART connection, a button for pairing and the proper mating connector for the SNES pad and you should get something off the ground.

It might be worth looking into one of the bluetooth SoC solutions out there, possibly saving some components/work, because the SoC would replace the microcontroller and dedicated bluetooth chip.

Quote:
RunnerPack wrote:For IR, the transmitter just needs a transistor to blink one or more LEDs at the right rate. Actually, I would use two set up like an AND gate. One input would be the 38KHz (or whatever) carrier generated by one microcontroller pin, and the other would be the actual data coming from another pin.

The receiver is even easier, since you can just use one of those IR receivers they put in consumer electronics (which can be had for pennies or even free if you can scrounge) to demodulate the IR back into a stream of data.

No matter what medium you use, this sounds like a very fun project!


Well, and you need analog filters, probably simulate them, and you have the usual IR problems, i.e. lost button presses, noisy environment, other IR sources screwing you, etc.

I'm not saying it's impossible, but it's definitely more involved, because you need to know your stuff, the various encoding schemes etc.

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#8
Re: Custom Wireless Controllers
Posted on: 2015/10/19 16:19
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Why does it have to be RF? Do you want to interface with an existing host or do you just need to send the control commands wirelessly?

I suggest moving to either 435 MHz or 868 MHz (frequently used in home automation) as sender and receiver units are available and they don't need to regulatory approval.

However, if you just want wireless transmission, look into Bluetooth or Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE). Chips and pre-made boards are available, less knowledge is required and when transmitting an HID-compliant profile, you don't need to write a PC driver.

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#9
Re: Link Cable project interest
Posted on: 2015/6/20 21:11
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Bump. Let's bring this back to page 1.

Any news are welcome, even if it's just a keep-alive.

cYa,

Tauwasser
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#10
Re: VB wont power on
Posted on: 2015/5/11 23:26
Nintendoid!
Joined 2006/11/16
139 Posts
Long Time User (12 Years)
Quote:

HonkeyKong wrote:
Are the pins numbered on the circuit board? Will take it appart and poke around when I get home.


It's fairly easy to find. The pins aren't numbered IIRC, but the keying of pin 4 (i.e. the absence of pin 4) will clue you in.

Power Good (PG) is actually used as #RESET (goes to all most chips) and goes out to the cartridge. So definitely you want to make sure that's at a high level when VOUT has settles to 5V.

cYa,

Tauwasser
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