All Posts (blitter)




#1
Re: First time you heard of the Virtual Boy
Posted on: 4/14 1:11
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Display unit at Toys 'R' Us, back probably around 1996, because it was right on the cusp of when the N64 was about to be released. There were (original) Game Boy displays, N64, SNES, PS1, and Saturn kiosks set up. Every once in a while you'd see a Pico too. *rolls eyes*

I joined PVB in 2007 while in college, after lurking for a couple of years. Had just bought my first VB off of a childhood friend of mine and thought it would be fun to develop for. Back when David Tucker and Alberto would still pop in every once in a while... ;)
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#2
Re: All hail the Virtual Boy
Posted on: 4/12 6:46
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
The way the VB is designed, you're supposed to hold the controller *behind* the stand, almost like you're hugging the VB as you play. When the stand is backwards it makes holding the controller that way difficult to do comfortably.
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#3
Re: All hail the Virtual Boy
Posted on: 4/11 23:47
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Anybody else notice Reggie's VB has the stand on backwards?
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#4
Re: Virtual Boy at GDC
Posted on: 3/31 21:51
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
The text on the placard next to it reads:

"In 1995, the videogame market was literally packed with options, so it is no surprise that Nintendo's unusual Virtual Boy system came and went in a flash. A standalone console, the Virtual Boy features a red and black display with impressive built-in 3D capabilities, if you can get through more than 15 minutes without a migraine! Seriously, we love the Virtual Boy, which will always hold a place in the history of videogaming."
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#5
Virtual Boy at GDC
Posted on: 3/31 21:41
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
As a game dev, I get to go to GDC every year, and this year the Videogame History Museum put together a spread dedicated to the "History of Nintendo," stretching all the way back to the Color TV Game. There were Nintendo consoles of all kinds set up for the public to play, including the Virtual Boy. However, most of these systems were in mint or near mint condition except for-- you guessed it-- our red and black friend.

The VB was mounted on the display stand, which although it was pretty neat that they had one, the adjustable piece was broken (too loose) and as a result I had to rest the head unit on my face as I played. The VB was loaded with Red Alarm, but as you can see in the attached photo, the right display suffered from the glitchy lines problem. I suspect this is why a lot of people would walk up to it, look in for a few seconds, then leave.

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jpg  IMG_3229.JPG (2,705.18 KB)
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jpg  IMG_3230.JPG (1,476.99 KB)
676_5339c61575a5e.jpg 2448X3264 px
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#6
Re: VSU Sandbox
Posted on: 3/12 23:31
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Update: Fixed a bug with channel 5 and setting properties of the EV1 register.

Attach file:


zip VB Sound Generator.zip Size: 369.44 KB; Hits: 4
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#7
Re: VSU Sandbox
Posted on: 3/12 10:15
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Mine is written in Objective-C++/Cocoa, so you're only going to be able to compile it on a Mac. ;) The VSU and audio engine parts are written in C++ though, so really only the GUI part would have to be rewritten.

Even though I cautiously left space in the GUI for it in the lower right, I didn't port over your entire vb_snd_gen, just the part that generates the audio. I modified it to generate it on the fly, since my primary motivation was to play around with the noise channel in order to find register values of percussion sounds I liked for my music engine. Creating files and playing them back simply took too long. ;) I pretty much took inspiration from this mock screenshot http://www.planetvb.com/modules/newbb ... ost_id=9560#forumpost9560 but stopped short of porting over the sequencer/code generation aspect of what you did, since I didn't need that. :P

The waveform-based emulation code is pretty accurate to my ears, down to the aliasing artifacts-- haven't done a wave-to-wave analysis vs. the hardware though. Verdict is still out on the noise channel, after also messing with it in Mednafen. Will have to try on hardware soon. However I'm still not sure how "interval" actually works, since both in that generator and in my own experiments writing for the VSU, all I get is silence. I must be doing something wrong.
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#8
Re: VSU Sandbox
Posted on: 3/12 5:58
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Screenshot:

Attach file:



png  Screen shot 2014-03-11 at 9.55.46 PM.png (124.26 KB)
676_531fe97eb273e.png 1056X802 px
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#9
VSU Sandbox
Posted on: 3/12 5:52
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
I took DogP's VB Sound Generator code here http://www.planetvb.com/modules/tech/?sec=tools&pid=vsuemu and created a GUI wrapper around the VSU emulator part of it, making it a sort of VSU sandbox. I needed this tool to be able to play around with the noise channel in real time, but maybe it could be of use to some of you too. The tool uses PortAudio for playback and is built for OS X 10.6 using XCode 4, but perhaps somebody with the motivation and know-how could port it to Windows if needed.

The source code is on Bitbucket: https://bitbucket.org/blitter/vb-sound-generator

FYI I wrote it in about a week, so it's still kind of rough around the edges, mainly that the audio playback gets pretty choppy if you turn on all six channels. I probably won't spend much more time on it though. ;)

Attach file:


zip VB Sound Generator.zip Size: 369.37 KB; Hits: 6
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#10
Re: Virtual Boy Development - Publishing titles?
Posted on: 2/18 21:01
Virtual Freak
Joined 2007/12/14
82 Posts
Long Time User (6 Years)
Quote:

affection wrote:
Do you think I could use the Flash memory from the FlashBoy to off load some of the files from RAM? Also is there any VRAM in the VB or does it just use the normal RAM for graphics?


If you include the OAM area, which is shared between the graphics processor and the CPU, then the VB has a grand total of almost 200K of usable RAM, but this area of memory is physically located elsewhere on the motherboard and isn't as fast as the WRAM (http://www.planetvb.com/modules/newbb ... php?topic_id=5369&forum=2) The Flash memory on the FlashBoy is an EEPROM which is programmed using the FlashBoy software on a Windows PC. Once programmed it's no different than ROM to the VB itself. A good idea as mentioned in my previous post is to precompile graphics and lookup tables into ROM, rather than generating them dynamically in the sparse RAM, especially if they're static once created.
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